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Heart to Heart منَ الْقَلْبِ اَلَى الْقَلْب

Reflection and Analysis of a Series of Dialogues


In the name of Allâh,
The full and continuous source of
Love, Mercy, Compassion, and Grace


Part 1

The Prophet ص related that Allâh, Exalted and Blessed, said;

“Oh My servants, I have forbidden Myself injustice,
and have made it forbidden to you; so do not be unjust
Oh My servants, all of you are lost but those I guide;
so seek guidance of Me, and I will guide you.
Oh My servants, all of you are hungry but those I feed;
so seek sustenance from Me, and I will feed you.”

Introduction

Opinions, preconceived notions, tales, stories, cognitions, attached meanings, are few of the many limitations we face in the challenge of understanding one another. In order to see things in proper perspective and context and broaden our view about truths besides our own, we need to, even if it is temporary, rid ourselves as much as we can from these shackles, regardless of their level of validity as presumed.

In the occidental literature and culture the word “faith” has certain connotations attached to it that may at times repulse a “free thinker” as one of its definitions as understood is “belief that is not based on proof” [3] coupled with the understanding of “Believing the Unbelievable” [4] as positive and as a religious duty and even the way to salvation; whereas the same word which is used in Islâmic literature as translated from the Arabic word “Îmân” (lit. belief) derived from the root alif-mîm-nûn meaning “to confirm, to be secure, safe, to learn, trust” as to affirmation and confirmation in the heart and mind [5], thus includes mind, thought and spiritual dimensions.

Îmân (dimension of intellect and heart) is also the basis for true and sincere Islâm (lit. to submit, actions) as one dimension cannot truly exist without the other and aid in increasing the level of one another. Islâm can be rendered as “commitment to submit and surrender to the will of Allâh ج willingly so that one could attain Allâh’s Pleasure thus can be in peace, tranquility, safety and be whole in this world and the hereafter” when its roots and Qur’ânic connotations are considered in perspective. The fruits of Islâm are “iĥsân” (doing the beautiful, excellence, perfection) [6], that is acting or living as if seeing Allâh, and doing everything only for the sake of Allâh ج and “ikhlâs” (sincerity). Therefore, îmân (confirmed belief of heart and mind) which relates to ‘aqêdah (religious creed), Islâm (submission), in its specific form, which relates to shari’ah (Islamic law), and iĥsân (doing the beautiful, excellence, perfection) which is taught by tasawwuf (sciences of the heart and soul, aka sufism) are integral parts of Islâm in general and marries sound intellect, correct actions and spiritual beauty in a most balanced fashion. [7]

Notes:

1 Allâh (اللهِ), the proper name of God in Arabic, as used by past prophets such as Jesus عليه سلم used in Aramaic ܐܠܗܐ (Alâhâ), and Moses عليه سلم in Hebrew as אלוה (eloah), Semitic cognates, also see Matthew 27:46 and Mark 15:34.

2 ج (Jalla Jalâluhu) one of the titles used while mentioning the name of Allâh meaning “His Glory is Great.”

3 http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/faith

4 http://www.newlifexn.org/apps/articles/web/articleid/7789/columnid/1255/default.asp
http://www.hidenwood.com/Sermons/07d15.html

5 Dictionary of The Holy Qur’ân by Abdul Omar Mannan, Lanes Arabic Lexicon Vol 1, pp. 103
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iman_%28concept%29

6 Iĥsân, Qur’ânic References: Forgiving others: 5:13, 3:134; Stewardship: 2:195, 3:134; Strive against evil: 29:69, 9:120; Generosity: 2:236; Humbleness: 2:58, 9:91, 5:82-85, 7:56, Righteousness, God-Consciousness, Patience: 12:90; Worship and Charity: 31:3, 11:114-115 also, Satisfaction with and Dependence on Allâh, obeying the Prophet’s way.

7 Vision of Islam by William Chittick & Sufism by Williams Chittick, also see Hujurat (49):14

Next Part: Heart to Heart Part 2

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One Comment

  1. Now I understand what I once thought was a jumble of confusing sufi love stories. When you lose someone so irreplaceable it gives you a taste. . . A small taste of what you lost when you parted from the beloved.


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